• Orkestra Marhaba

    Re-imaginations of Music from the Mediterranean and beyond......

  • About Marhaba

    Marhaba (or 'Merhaba' in Turkish) can mean 'welcome' or 'hello' in Arabic and Turkish and is meant to reflect the sound of this group! Orkestra Marhaba started in 2011 when a quartet of musicians coming back from a concert talked about their shared curiosity around makam - a system of defining musical scales in Turkish classical music. As four minds are better than one, a working group of musicians in the Boston area came together every week with their different instruments to discover and strengthen their knowledge of makam and the world of Ottoman art music.
     
    Since then our ranks have grown and modified, and so has our music: Ottoman court music dating from the early 16th century to modern Turkish composers, light classical love songs called şarkı, short strophic hymns called ilahi, dance pieces such as sirto and longa, timeless folk music from the Anatolian landscape, Ayinleri (compositions for dervishes to turn to whose lyrics come from Rumi's Mathnawi) and Turkish folk songs called türkü. Finally, an ever evolving series of original compositions, where our minds can feel free to fly with the help of makam theory.

  • Musicians of Marhaba

    All the members of Orkestra Marhaba have long and varied musical histories of their own. Read on to find out who we are!

    Frederick Stubbs

    Frederick Stubbs

    Frederick Stubbs is a founding member of Orkestra Marhaba, Euphony Groove and The Eurasia Ensemble. An ethnomusicologist specializing in the art of taksim (improvisation), he also teaches music at University of Massachusetts-Boston, and at the Lexington Montessori School. Fred is a native New Englander and uses woods like cherry, pine and maple to craft neys, bendirs, tanburs, cellos, basses and various other instruments.

     

    F. Stubbs picture courtesy of X. Lobosco

    Diana Traylor

    Diana came to the group to work on her improvisational skills. She played oboe (unusual in Turkish classical music) for a year before she reconnected with the violin after nearly 30 years. Diana is also a teacher at the Lexington Montessori School where she uses art and music to encourage learning amongst her students. Apart from being a musician and a teacher, she is a master at creating clay sculptures of Marhaba members. Needless to say, we can only aspire to be as endearing as her clay creations!

     

    D. Traylor picture courtesy of S.Baliga

    Tev Stevig

    Marhaba's tanbur player, Tev is a specialist in stringed instruments including, guitar, clawhammer style fretless guitar, banjo, cumbus and ukelele. He plays with a variety of Balkan, Greek and modern ensembles in the Boston area and is currently building his own tanbur. In addition to being a 'string theorist', Tev is also an avid surfer and is constantly on the lookout for monster waves to tame. He has also combined music and surfing successfully by composing 'Makam Surfin' for Marhaba. Learn more about Tev at www.tevstevig.com

     

    T. Stevig picture courtesy of S. Baliga

    Shanteri Baliga

    Referred to as the 'Timekeeper' with reference to keeping usul (rhythm/meter) during rehearsals and performances, Shanteri plays ney, bendir and sings the vocal repertoire that spans secular and sacred. She has been a student of Fred Stubbs since 1995 and has appeared with a variety of groups and musicians such as Flamenco, spoken word, modern dance and fusion. A graduate of Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts Boston, her interest in world music can be credited to having traveled extensively as a child as well as coming from a family that listened to music constantly.

     

    S.Baliga picture courtesy of X. Lobosco

    Mike Harrist

    Mike Harrist

    Mike is a familiar musician on the Boston music scene playing with gypsy jazz trio Ameranouche as well as his own band Sol & Kiel. Mike is a graduate of Marlboro College in Vermont and has studied with various musicians such as W.A Mathieu, Stan Charkey and James Macdonald and has also studied with religious scholar Amer Latif. In addition to bass, Mike has also begun an exploration into usul (meter), North Indian classical singing and yayli tanbur. Learn more about Mike's adventures at www.michaelharrist.com

     

    M.Harrist picture courtesy of D. Simons

    Volkan Efe

    Primarily an ud player, Volkan also plays saz, ney, tanbur, kemençe and occasionally lends his voice to the vocal repertoire. Originally from Turkey, his vast knowledge and innate familiarity with this music has been crucial in helping craft our sound by bringing pieces to add to Orkestra Marhaba's repertoire. Volkan also plays with Cambridge Musiki Cemiyeti as well as other Turkish music groups in Boston and makes sure to keep Marhaba rehearsals and concerts well supplied with baklava. Currently Volkan is on a mission to combine his two greatest passions: electrical engineering and music.
     

    V. Efe picture courtesy of A. Efe

    Emel A. Ergul

    For Emel, music is a way to understand and inspire nature and people. After a first brush in her teens playing saz, Emel rediscovered music after graduate school at Brandeis University as a way to communicate with no boundaries. She studied cello at the South Shore Conservatory and currently plays in various amateur chamber music groups and small orchestras. Emel is a member of Cambridge Musiki Cemiyeti and ACMP (Associated Chamber Music Players).

     

    E. Ergul picture courtesy of A. Ergul

  • Concerts

    Since becoming a group in 2011, Marhaba has appeared in a variety of performance venues including:

    The Lilypad, Cambridge, MA

    Club Passim, Cambridge, MA

    Make Music Matter, Eustis Estate, Milton, MA

    Marlboro College, Marlboro VT

    Tufts University, Medford, MA

    Old Ship Church, Hingham, MA

    Third Sunday @3 Concerts, Waltham MA

    In Celebration of Rumi, Waltham, Cambridge, Newton MA

    Lexington Montessori School, Lexington MA

    Powers Music School, Belmont MA

    Colors of Anatolia Concert, Goethe Institute, Boston MA

    Boston College, Chestnut Hill MA

    Cambridge Rindge & Latin School, Cambridge MA

    Friends Meeting House, Putney VT

    Balkan Night, Concord MA

    Stone Church Concerts, Bellows Falls VT

    Taylor House Concerts, Jamaica Plain MA

    Albright Art Gallery, Concord MA

    Tales from Another Classic Music, Lexington MA

    Mariposa Museum, Peterborough NH

    Touch Art Gallery, Cambridge MA

    Putney Friends Meetinghouse, Putney VT

    White Tulip Health Foundation, Boston, MA

    White Tulip Health Foundation, Providence, RI

    The Outpost, Cambridge, MA

    MIT Chapel, Cambridge, MA

    Women Encouraging Empowerment Annual Fundraiser, Revere, MA

    Memorial Church, Harvard University, MA

    Iranian Association of Boston, Watertown, MA

  • Sounds of Marhaba

    Scroll down to enjoy our sonic adventures!

    At Stone Church Concerts in Bellows Falls, VT

    Playing an Anatolian folk song 'Keklik dağlarda şağılar'

    At Powers Music School in Belmont, MA

    Playing an instrumental piece from the Ottoman tradition: Muhayyer Saz Semaisi composed by Tanburi Cemil Bey (d. 1916)

    At Stone Church Concert in Bellows Falls, VT

    Playing an instrumental piece from the Ottoman tradition: Ferahfeza Peşrev composed by Muallim Ismail Hakki Bey (d.1927)

    At Tufts University, Medford, MA

    Playing during the first movement of Suzidil Ayin, a form of music composed specifically for dervishes. Composed by Zekai Dede Efendi (d.1897).

    Taksim (improvisation) in Sultaniyegah

    During a rehearsal, the group works on beraber taksim or a group improvisation in a mode called Sultaniyegah. Once the improvisation finishes, you hear the first few notes of a saz semaisi in this mode.

     

    ney: Fred Stubbs

    yaylī tanbur: Mike Harrist

    keman: Diana Traylor

    kemençe: Volkan Efe

    tanbur: Tev Stevig

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Taksim (improvisation) in Nikriz over an ostinato

    Tev improvises over an ostinato set by the group in a mode called Nikriz. After the taksim, Volkan brings everyone back into the main melody. This is a Nikriz sirto (a dance piece) composed by Tanburi Cemil Bey.

     

    keman: Fred Stubbs

    yaylī tanbur: Mike Harrist

    keman: Diana Traylor

    ud: Volkan Efe

    tanbur: Tev Stevig

    cello: Emel Ergul

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Taksim (improvisation) in Huseyni

    During a rehearsal, the group works on a Huseyni taksim. Once the improvisation finishes, you hear the first few notes of a saz semaisi in this mode.

     

    keman: Fred Stubbs

    yaylī tanbur: Mike Harrist

    ud: Volkan Efe

    cello: Emel Ergul

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Extended improvisation

    This shows how multiple instruments can move in an out of different makams, together in order to create a musical tapestry.

     

    keman: Fred Stubbs

    yaylī tanbur: Mike Harrist

    ney: Shanteri Baliga

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

     

    'Niçin bülbül figân eyler' sarki in mode Hicaz

    Şarkı is light classical form in vocal music, with lyrics often focusing on themes of love.This particular şarkı was composed by Ri'ifat Bey (1820-1888) and is played in the usul (meter) Curcuna, which is in a 10/16 time signature.

     

    Niçin bülbül figân eyler bahâr eyyâmıdır şimdi
    Açılmış gonceler güller mesâr eyyâmıdır şimdi
    Hezâr âsâ figân etme gönül şevkiyle handân ol
    Açılmış gonceler güller mesâr eyyâmıdır şimdi
     

    .....Nightingale why do you cry so, spring days have arrived!

     

    ud: Volkan Efe

    keman: Diana Traylor

    cello: Fred Stubbs

    vocals and bendir: Shanteri Baliga

     

     filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

     

    Nikriz Sirto

    Nikriz sirto played over a variation of 4/4 usul (meter)

     

    ud: Volkan Efe

    tanbur: Tev Stevig

    bendir: Shanteri Baliga

    keman: Fred Stubbs

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Uşşak Saz Semaisi, composed by Neyzen Aziz Dede (1835-1905)

    This short clip shows a teslim (refrain) of this very famous and much played piece.

     

    yaylı tanbur : Mike Harrist

    keman: Fred Stubbs

    cello: Emel Ergul

    ney: Shanteri Baliga

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    'Bülbülüm Altın Kafeste', Anatolian folk song

    This folk song, about a bird in a golden cage, is in Acemkürdi makam and played in a meter called Aksak (9/8).

     

    saz: Volkan Efe

    keman: Fred Stubbs

    cello: Emel Ergul

    bendir and voice: Shanteri Baliga

     

    Bülbülüm altın kafeste bülbülüm altın kafeste....my nightingale in a golden cage

    Öter aheste aheste öter aheste aheste...it cries out slowly

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Acemaşiran taksim

    Improvisation in mode Acemaşiran.

     

    yaylı tanbur : Mike Harrist

    keman: Diana Traylor

    cello: Emel Ergul

    ney: Fred Stubbs, Shanteri Baliga

    tanbur: Tev Stevig

    kemençe: Volkan Efe

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    La Vie en Rose

    Orkestra Marhaba imagines what this famous song might sound like!

     

    bass : Mike Harrist

    cello: Emel Ergul

    bendir: Fred Stubbs

    ney: Shanteri Baliga

    ud: Tev Stevig

    kemençe: Volkan Efe

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Pençgah Peşrev

    A brief window into Pençgah Peşrev (composed by neyzen Salih Dede, mid 19th century)

     

    yaylı tanbur : Mike Harrist

    cello: Emel Ergul

    ney: Fred Stubbs, Shanteri Baliga

    ud: Volkan Efe

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    Ferahfeza taksim

    An exploratory improvisation blending right into the refrain of this piece composed by Ismail Hakki Bey, early 20th century)

     

    keman: Diana Traylor

    cello: Emel Ergul, Fred Stubbs

    ney: Shanteri Baliga

    kanun: Volkan Efe

     

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    'Calling Spring'

    Free improvisation inspired by the cold weather!

     

    keman: Diana Traylor

    cello: Emel Ergul

    ney: Fred Stubbs, Shanteri Baliga

    kemençe: Volkan Efe

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2017)

    'From snow to warmth'

    Improvisation in Hicaz makam, followed by excerpt of Hicaz saz semaisi (composed by Veli Dede d.1768)

     

    viola: Fred Stubbs

    yaylı tanbur : Mike Harrist

    ney: Tarık Ucmaklı, Shanteri Baliga

    kemençe: Volkan Efe

    bendir: Ceren Turkmenoglu

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2018)

    'Rhythms, Out of Time'

    Going from a long 8/8 cycle to a 3 cycle.

     

    bendir: Fred Stubbs, Diana Traylor, Emel Ergul, Volkan Efe, Tarık Ucmaklı, Mike Harrist, Ceren Turkmenoglu, Shanteri Baliga

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2018)

    'A Maze in Grace Notes/Amazing Grace'

    Improvisation around the hymn 'Amazing Grace'

     

    keman: Fred Stubbs, Diana Traylor

    yaylı tanbur : Mike Harrist

    ney: Shanteri Baliga

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2018)

    'Uzun Ince Bir Yoldayim...'

    From the troubadour tradition....

     

    voices: Emel Ergul, Begum Erenler

    violin: Theresa Thompson

    viola : Fred Stubbs

    ney: Nihat Tokdil, Shanteri Baliga

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2018)

    'Segah in Strings'

    Segah Saz Semaisi, composed by Nayi Osman Dede (18th century)

     

    cello: Emel Ergul

    violin: Diana Traylor, Theresa Thompson

    viola : Fred Stubbs

    ud: Volkan Efe

    bendir: Shanteri Baliga

    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2018)

    'Modal Birds'

    Bird songs interspersed with ney, kemence, violin and cello

     

    ney solo: Fred Stubbs

    kemençe: Volkan Efe

    cello: Emel Ergul

    violin: Diana Traylor, Theresa Thompson

    ney​ drone: Shanteri Baliga


    filmed and edited by: S. Baliga (2018)

  • Listen to us on Soundcloud!

  • Music of Marhaba

    The main focus of Orkestra Marhaba's music has been Turkish Classical, Folk, Sacred Music and Art Music (Türk sanat müziği) developed during the Ottoman empire. Traditionally, the main instruments were ney, tanbur, bendir, ud, kemençe and kanun with the addition of keman in later years. In this art music, there are a variety of instrumental and vocal forms. There is also a rich tradition of taksim, or improvisation, which may occur within or between pieces, or accompanied by a rhythm, or sometimes in silence perhaps supported by other musicians.

     

    Unlike the art music, many regions of Turkey have their own distinct variety of folk music. Türk halk müziği, refers to the folk music of Anatolia which incorporates a large number of styles, such as türkü, ilahi, sirto and oyun hava. Typically the instruments used are saz and bağlama, both long necked stringed instruments, zurna, which is a double reed woodwind and davul, a large bass drum played with mallets.

     

    Orkestra Marhaba also plays the Mevlevi repertoire of Ayin-i-Şerif, traditional compositions played during the turning ceremony of dervishes. These compositions, of which 20-50 survive today, are performed in 4 movements over specific rhythm patterns. Finally, a growing amount of our practice is to also to explore and examine original compositions, or to take classical or folk pieces and interpret them in a more adventurous way, perhaps with the addition of a more modern instrument (fretless guitar, double bass) or a change the rhythm.

  • The Instruments

    Our primary instruments are ney, ud, tanbur, keman, bowed & plucked double bass, davul, bendir, kemençe, cello, yayli tanbur and voice. The instruments all have their own stories and functions and together help to create the sound that is Marhaba!

    Close up of the tuning pegs on a tanbur

    Tanbur (or tambur) is a long necked fretted instrument that is considered to be one of the 4 primary instruments in Turkish Art Music. The tanbur here is of the plucked variety: mızraplı, the word mızrap referring to the plectrum. The body is typically made from a variety of wood strips formed along a mold over which is a soundboard that resonates. Frets made from catgut are wrapped at intervals along the long neck and 7 strings run from the tuning pegs down to the bridge on the soundboard. The mızrap for a tanbur is generally made of turtle shell.

    Lateral view of a kemençe

    Kemençe (or kemenche) literally translates to 'small bow', is a small pear shaped, stringed and bowed musical instrument. Though originating as a folk instrument in the Eastern Mediterranean, it has firmly sealed it's position in Ottoman classical music since the mid 19th century. It is played in an upright position placed on the lap with the strings facing outward. Sound is created by pressing fingernails to each string (similar to the Indian sarangi) and drawing a bow across and tuning pegs are placed on the back of the uppermost top of the instrument. The entire instrument is made from one piece of wood.

    Box of assorted neys (cane and wood)

    The ney is perhaps most closely associated with sufism, Mevlevi rituals and Rumi, however it also occupies a crucial place in Ottoman music as part of the idea of incesaz (meaning 'thin instrument'). The trio of ney, tanbur and kemençe, with the addition of bendir for rhythm are sometimes all that is necessary to create an orchestral sound.

     

    Neys are typically made from cane, is end blown, with a horn mouthpiece (başpare), one thumb hole and six holes on the other side. They are also crafted in different lengths, from 52 cm to 104 cm, with each length corresponding to a different tuning or pitch called akord. The neys played in Marhaba are made from wood as well as the more traditional cane.

    Bendir, Davul

    Bendir is a frame drum found throughout Turkey and the Middle East and has many 'drum cousins' in other parts of the world that operate along the same mechanism, which is a skin stretched out over a round wooden frame that resonates when struck. Bendirs are played holding the drum in one hand and striking the face of the drum with the other hand. Though historically bendirs use animal skin, modern examples are often made with a synthetic head. Sometimes, there is a snare running either on the inside or the frame of the drum to create a buzzing noise when played.

     

    A davul is a large barrel drum that has skin on both sides and is struck with mallets on both ends. Davuls are mostly played during folk dances throughout Turkey, the Balkans, Greece and the Mediterranean.

     

    It is important to note the position of usul (meter) in this music. There is a vocabulary and a syntax to meter and every piece has an accompanying meter associated with it.

    Soundholes and pattern on Ud

    Ud (or oud), a short necked stringed, unfretted lute that is used in Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Jewish, Mediterranean and other musics, is often considered to be the ancestor of the modern-day guitar. The plucking action is accomplished with a plectrum called mızrap. The mızrap for an ud is typically made of plastic and is thin and softer. Modern day examples fall into either the Arabic variety, which are larger and have a deeper sound, or the Turkish variety which is smaller and tuned one step above the Arabic ud, leading to higher sound. The example above shows the face of an ud with the string courses, and rosettes and was made in Kayseri, Turkey.

    Keman

    Occupying a more recent place in Ottoman art music, violins were not native instruments of the Turkish Court until European travelers arrived in the early 18th century. Until that time the only bowed instrument was the kemençe. The word ‘keman’ is Persian in origin and was generally used to indicate some sort of bowing action. The arrival of the western violin did not seem to create much of a furore, as the viola d’amore with its’ sympathetic strings was more in fashion. The Turkish name for this viola became sînekemani as it was played held against the chest (sîne meaning 'chest'), as violins are played today.

    By the 19th century the western violin increased in usage and today it has become a common and perhaps in some ways essential instrument in traditional Turkish ensembles as well as in folk and dance music.

    Bass

    The double bass began to appear in the late 16th century in Germany and Italy and is often thought of as a member of the violin family. Typical construction uses spruce for the belly and maple for the ribs, neck and back, though newer experiments may use cedar or pine for the belly and poplar or beech for the rest of the instrument. Bass is not a traditional instrument in Turkish classical music, however Marhaba has found this instrument to be a natural fit for interpreting classical and even folk repertoire. The low range of the instrument makes it possible to walk the line between usul and melody. Bassists may also take cues from the documented history of the cello in makam music and is therefore ripe territory for the contemporary double bassist as it has become more common and popular for players of today to play in the "cello" register of the instrument. Of course bassists may also take inspiration from the bowed instruments that have been central to the tradition: kemençe, rebab, and yaylı tambur.

  • Marhaba Vocabulary

    As in any music genre, there is a vocabulary that becomes part of the conversation. Here are some terms we use during rehearsals and concert planning:

     

    Makam: a modal system defining musical scales in Turkish music. This could be analogous to raaga in Indian classical music.

     

    Akord: pitch or key in which a piece in played. This is not to be confused with the the concept of 'key' in Western classical music.

     

    Peşrev: instrumental form typically in 4 sections with a refrain, written in major meters.

     

    Şarkı: a type of non-religious vocal song, generally focusing on themes such as love and separation. The verses are typically 3 or 4 lines followed by a refrain.

     

    Sâz Semâîsi: instrumental form in 4 sections and a refrain. In general, 3 of the sections and the refrain is written in a 10/8 meter and the 4th section is written in a 6/8 meter.

     

    Güçlü: the dominant note in a makam.

     

    Karar: the tonic of a makam.

     

    Usûl: meter. Meters can range from 2/2 to 128/4, with each meter having a name of it's own.

     

    İnce: Literally translated as 'thin', this term is often to used to describe a form of playing where all instruments play together in unison.

     

    Fasıl: a suite of various forms, instrumental and vocal, moving from slower to faster in tempo in a particular makam.

     

    Neyzen: honorific for someone who plays the ney.

     

    Kemani: honorific for someone who plays the violin (keman).

     

    Udi: honorific for someone who plays the ud.

     

    Tanburi: honorific for someone who plays the tanbur.

     

    Taksim: improvisation. This can happen between individual pieces, or within a piece, with accompaniment from other instruments or in silence.

     

    Aranağme: refrain.

     

    Türkü: term for vocal folk melodies.

  • Marhaba Events/Information

    Information on upcoming events

    In Celebration of Rumi, 2018

    On November 4th, Orkestra Marhaba will play during the 19th annual 'In Celebration of Rumi' event with poetry readings set to music followed by a Sema, where dervishes turn to a sung text.

     

    November 4th, 3pm: Friends Meeting House, 5 Longfellow Park, Cambridge, MA

     

    $15 Regular admission

     

    $7 Seniors & Students

     

     
    Picture courtesy Beena Sarwar

    Saturday, August 4th, 2pm

    Cary Memorial Library, Lexington MA, free

     

    Thursday, June 21st, 5:30pm

    Eustis Estate, Milton, MA, free.

    Orkestra Marhaba plays a concert on the longest day of the year!

     

     

    Thursday, January 25th, 8pm

    Gallery 263, 263 Pearl Street,

    Cambridge, MA (doors open at 7:30pm), $10

    Orkestra Marhaba plays a concert exploring different rhythms, with accompanying vocal and instrumental music.

    In Celebration of Rumi, 2017

    On November 4th and 5th 2017, Orkestra Marhaba will play during the 18th annual 'In Celebration of Rumi' event with poetry readings set to music followed by a Sema, where dervishes turn to a sung text.

     

    November 4th, 7:30pm: Koumantzelis Auditorium, Bentley University, 175 Forest Street, Waltham, MA

     

    November 5th, 3pm: Temple Beth Israel, 25 Harvard Street, Waltham, MA

     

    Tickets can be purchased at the door or through eventbrite.

     

    $15 Regular admission

     

    $7 Seniors & Students

     

    Wednesday, June 21st@ The Lilypad, 7:30pm
    1353 Cambridge Street, Inman Square, Cambridge

     

    $10 at the door

     

    Fred Stubbs - ney, bendir, cello

    Volkan Efe - oud, kemence, voice

    Diana Traylor - violin
    Emel Ergul - cello
    Mike Harrist - yayli tanbur
    Tev Stevig - tanbur

    Shanteri Baliga - ney, bendir, voice

    Monday, October 23rd@Passim, 7pm
    47 Palmer Street, Cambridge

    tickets: http://passim.org/club/small-world-big-ears-orkestra-marhaba-atlas-soul

    Orkestra Marhaba appears at this intimate and cozy setting at Passim's to play some of our favorite pieces! We share the evening along with 'Atlas Soul'. A wonderful opportunity to listen to some world music with an original flair!

    Thursday, November 2nd, 7pm

    300 Higgins Hall, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA

    Orkestra Marhaba plays a free concert showcasing different forms of Turkish music: Classical, sacred, instrumental, vocal and dance

     

    Free and open to the public!

     

     

    Thursday, April 20th @ The Lilypad, 7:30pm
    1353 Cambridge Street, Inman Square, Cambridge

     

    $10 at the door

     

    Fred Stubbs - ney, bendir, cello

    Volkan Efe - oud, kemence, voice

    Diana Traylor - violin
    Emel Ergul - cello
    Mike Harrist - yayli tanbur
    Tev Stevig - tanbur

    Shanteri Baliga - ney, bendir, voice

     

     

    Wednesday March 23rd @ Outpost, 8pm $10
    186 1/2 Hampshire Street in Inman Square, Cambridge

    Fred Stubbs - ney
    Shanteri Baliga - ney, voice, bendir
    Tev Stevig - tanbur, fretless guitar
    Volkan Efe - oud, kemence
    Diana Traylor - violin
    Michael Harrist - contrabass, yayli tanbur

     

     

    Orkestra Marhaba joins Ross Daly and Kelly Thoma during their New England Tour!

    Thursday April 7th, 2016: MIT Chapel, Cambridge.

    Admission by donation

     

     

    In Celebration of Rumi, 2016

    On November 5th and 6th 2016, Orkestra Marhaba will play during the 17th annual 'In Celebration of Rumi' event with poetry readings set to music followed by a Sema, where dervishes turn to a sung text.

     

    November 5th, 7:30pm: Koumantzelis Auditorium, Bentley University, 175 Forest Street, Waltham, MA

     

    November 6th, 3pm: First Unitarian Society, 1326 Washington Street, Newton, MA

     

    Tickets can be purchased at the door or through eventbrite.

     

    $15 Regular admission

     

    $7 Seniors & Students

    Wednesday August 24th @ Outpost, 8pm
    186 1/2 Hampshire Street in Inman Square, Cambridge

    Fred Stubbs - ney, bendir

    Tev Stevig - tanbur, fretless guitar

    Volkan Efe - oud, kemence, voice
    Diana Traylor - violin

    Emel Ergul - cello

    Music of the Middle East (NECSEM Conference): Selections from Orkestra Marhaba, Bella-Musiqa and Miras

    Saturday May 7th, 2016: Snowden Auditorium, UMass Boston, 7:30pm

    In Celebration of Rumi, 2015

    On October 17th and 18th 2015, Orkestra Marhaba will play during the annual 'In Celebration of Rumi' event with poetry readings set to music followed by a Sema, where dervishes turn to a sung text.
     
    October 17th, 7:30pm: Koumantzelis Auditorium, Bentley University, 175 Forest Street, Waltham, MA
     
    October 18th, 3pm: First Unitarian Society, 1326 Washington Street, Newton, MA
     
    Tickets can be purchased at the door or through eventbrite (starting September 17th)
     
     
    $15 Regular admission
    $7 Seniors & Students
     
    This is the 16th year for this event and we look forward to bringing another beautiful piece of ceremonial music to life!

    Playing at the late Shahab Ahmed's memorial service at Memorial Church, Harvard University, November 2015

    http://beenasarwar.com/2015/11/17/remembering-shahab-ahmed/

    Sema: A Ceremony of the Whirling Dervishes

    A free concert on March 9th, 2016, 8pm at the Distler Performance Hall, Granoff Music Center.

     

    https://www.facebook.com/events/1555762674715177/

  • Say 'Marhaba' to us!

    We like hearing from our listeners! Did you recently hear us at a concert and wonder about a piece? Are you an instrument maker and curious about the instruments we play? Did you want Orkestra Marhaba to play at a concert? Email us below or at orkestramarhaba@gmail.com.

    Find us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/OrkestraMarhaba